Best Ice Fishing Gloves: Finding the Warmest Grip

If you’re anything like me, you might still be out fishing with a headlamp, freezing your fingers as winter sets in. It’s time to get inside once the water has melted. It is time to get out there and upgrade your gear. Fishing in winter can be more difficult than fishing with summer lures.

Cold fingers are one of the fastest ways to break through the ice. While we can all enjoy a snowstorm while sipping on hot chocolate from the shanty, none of us will last very long without our fingers frozen.

How can we prevent our delicate digits from getting icing?

We’ll be looking at the key features that make great ice fishing gloves different from others. We will also save you time and help you to spend more time fishing, rather than shopping. Check out our guide to ice fishing boots if you want to keep your feet warm.

Here are our top picks.

  • Glacier Glove Pro Angler – Our Pick!
  • Memphis Glove Ninja Ice FC Nylon
  • Pelagic End-Game Fishing Gloves
  • Glacier Glove Alaska River Series Flip Mitt
  • Stormr Typhoon Women and Men
  • Neo Sport Neoprene Wetsuit Gloves: Our Pick

The Best Ice Fishing Gloves – Reviewed

Glacier Glove Pro Angler

Glacier Glove Pro Angler Neoprene Glove L - Black

Neoprene, which can trap and repel water and keep it warm, is one of the most versatile water fabrics. The Pro Angler, a fingerless glove made of neoprene and featuring finger “caps”, keeps everyone warm.

You’ve probably worn neoprene at one time or another. The seams can sometimes be bulky and cumbersome. Pro Angler aims to keep seams at the edges of gloves, while the seamless palm maintains dexterity. To help you maneuver around the shanty, the three first fingers of each glove are coated with grippy rubber.

These gloves are extremely heat-bulky thanks to their neoprene lining and internal fleece lining. However, while fleece and neoprene make an inexpensive combination, the pre-curved fingers help to keep the hand in the correct place.

These gloves are great for moderate conditions.

Pros

  • Thumb and slit finger
  • For warmth, fleece-lined Neoprene
  • Seamless palm

Cons

  • Wind and snow can enter through fingers that have slits.
  • Palms lack grip material

Memphis Glove Ninja Ice FC Nylon

Memphis Glove N9690FCL Ninja Ice FC Nylon Back Double Layer Gloves with Full Dipped HPT Coating, Black, Large, 1-Pair The Memphis Glove Ninja Ice may be the right choice for you if you are prone to getting wet while ice fishing, and don’t want your hands and fingers to become soggy. These rubberized gloves are double-layered and will withstand any kind of tsunami.

This glove does NOT have removable fingerless options. Either you are wearing the glove, or not. If you can take the gloves off to handle fish, line, and tackle, then that might be okay for you.

These gloves are fully rubberized and waterproof. Remember, however, that the rubber outer stops at the wrist so even if your hand is submerged in water, it will still get wet.

See also  How to Use a Fish Finder?

The acrylic terrycloth liner inside is not too thick but adds just enough warmth. The rubberized exterior traps and holds warm air.

The Ninja Ice is the best choice for anyone who needs waterproof protection but doesn’t mind the shorter glove.

Pros

  • Very affordable
  • Acrylic terry liner
  • PVC foam sponge palms

Cons

  • Cuff for short gloves
  • There is no fingerless option

Gloves for End Game Fishing in Pelagics

Pelagic End Game Gloves | Size L/XL | YellowThe Pelagic End Game Fishing Gloves may be for you if you love the mechanic-style, operator-inspired gloves. These gloves are great for fishing in protected shanties and will provide excellent grip reinforcement.

Perhaps you are like me and fish more in the summer than in the winter months. You’ll probably be ice fishing in the summer months, but you won’t go out without a heater, a book, and a flask.

The arctic explorer gloves may not be necessary. You may not need the arctic explorer gloves. Instead, you will just need some warmth and protection to handle augers, spuds, and wet (cold), fish.

The Pelagic gloves feature velcro wrist cuffs that can be adjusted to adjust the fit. To help you get online with no hassle and to keep fins out of your hands when you catch that walleye, the palms have been reinforced.

These gloves are ideal for anyone looking for multi-purpose gloves that can be used for everything from ice skating to summer charter trips.

Pros

  • High dexterity
  • Reinforced palm
  • Cuff strap adjustable

Cons

  • It is not waterproof or windproof.
  • Low heat
  • There is no fingerless option

Glacier Glove Alaska River Series Flip Mitt

Glacier Glove Alaska River Fingerless Flip Mitt Glove L - Black (759BK L)I’m sure I said in the buyer’s guide that hybrid mitts make the best gloves for ice fishing. You should check out the Alaska River Series Flip Mitt from Glacier Glove.

Because mittens keep your fingers warm, they are more comfortable than gloves. This neoprene fishing mitten is a great choice for colder temperatures.

Because of their shape, mittens are not very dexterous. You can work around this by simply folding down the mitten portion. The fingerless glove underneath will allow each finger full dexterity. The thumb can also be opened.

These gloves are versatile and a great choice.

Pros

  • High dexterity
  • Windproof
  • Fingerless mittens

Cons

  • Neoprene 2mm is quite thin
  • Wind and snow can get in

Stormr Typhoon Women and Men

STORMR Typhoon Neoprene Glove, Color: Black, Size: L (RXG30N-01-L)Storm offers a few ice fishing gloves, and they all seem to be very well-loved. We recommend the Typhoon because it is one of our most durable and large gloves.

These gloves have a longer cuff than the smaller ones on the list. This glove is perfect for keeping the wind and water off your wrists. The storm also added a pull tab to make it easier to put on and take off the gloves.

They aren’t going to be the most precise glove on our list. The water-resistant Neoprene and the siliconized palms will provide warmth and help with shedding water.

Storm claims that there is Kevlar in certain areas of the gloves to increase their tear resistance and overall durability.

His is a great option if you are looking for a sturdy, tall glove that can shed water and wind.

Pros

  • Long cuffs
  • Silicone grips for the palm
  • Kevlar reinforced

Cons

  • Large gloves indicate low dexterity
  • There is no fingerless option

Neo Sport Neoprene Gloves for Wetsuits

The Neo-Sports are giving the Stormr gloves a run for the money.

The Neo Sport gloves are thicker than the others on this list. Both 3mm and 5mm materials can be used, but the thicker gloves (5mm) will require more dexterity and make it harder to use the gear.

See also  Catfish Stings and How to Hold a Catfish Safely

This is the biggest problem. You’ll need to take off your gloves if you have to do anything with your fingers. This means you will have to deal with cold fingers even if the gloves are on!

However, I believe neoprene is a great choice for many ice anglers. If you are going to be getting wet or staying wet in the coldest temperatures, the 5mm thick gloves might be your best option.

Pros

  • Gloves 3mm to 5mm thick
  • Sewn and glued seams
  • Easy-flexing design

Cons

  • It is more difficult to use thicker gloves
  • Neoprene won’t keep your hands wet, but it will keep them warm.
  • There is no fingerless option

How to choose the best ice fishing gloves?

Insulation

Any ice fishing glove’s primary task is to keep fingers and hands warm. Some basic concepts will help you do this.

First, an ice fishing glove insulation must trap air between your hand & the glove’s outside. The trapped air is heated by your body to create the insulating layer that keeps you warm.

The warmer your glove is, the more insulation it has.

You’ll need a thicker glove if you fish on open ice than if your shanty is protected and heated.

Windproof layers

The glove won’t be able to do its job if the warm, trapped air is removed and replaced by cold air.

Wind can cause your gloves to lose their warm air layer. The wind can instantly reduce the warmth of your gloves by blowing across the ice and hitting them.

Windproof gloves prevent outside air from moving so that your warm insulation is not interrupted. This is particularly important if you fish in exposed areas outside of a shanty.

Waterproof layers

You can almost guarantee that your ice fishing gloves get wet, no matter if you are fishing in the open or a shanty. You don’t have to worry about the water coming off the line or the fish as long as it stays frozen.

Pro Tip: All waterproof gloves can be made windproof but not waterproof.

Fingerless gloves allow you to safely handle fish and line while avoiding any potential injury. To prevent your gloves from getting wet, you might be tempted to take your gloves off while handling fish. You might not need waterproof gloves if this is you.

Non-breathable gloves can be more expensive than waterproof breathable gloves. However, winter can bring on cold hands due to the moisture in gloves. WPB gloves are a good choice for ice fishing.

You can also wear rubber nitrile gloves underneath your ice fishing gloves in extreme situations. These gloves will protect your fingers from getting wet when handling wet gear, and they will prevent your hands from slipping out of your main gloves. It will be amazing how much warmer it stays!

Gloves without Fingers

Fishing requires fingerless gloves. You can make your choice. It’s difficult to find a better glove for ice fishing.

Real fingerless gloves have the first two knuckles missing from the glove. Some gloves have all-finger open tips. These gloves are suitable for ice fishing in a shanty.

The hybrid gloves are hard to beat, however. These gloves are fingerless and can be hidden underneath a removable mitten. They can be fingered with removable finger “caps” or they can be fingerless gloves.

See also  Catfish Fishing 101 Tips

You will need a fingerless glove or convertible glove if you are going to remove a hook or handle a fish.

Pro Tip: Wear a nitrile glove underneath your fingerless glove. This will not only keep your hands warmer but also protect your fingers from the cold when you handle fish or line.

Rubberized Gloves

Many ice fishing gloves include rubberized parts. This is usually a rubber palm. Rarely will they be fully rubberized, like the heavy-duty dish-washing gloves for the kitchen.

Rubber is a great gripping material and waterproof. The main drawback to rubber is the loss of dexterity when there is more than a thin layer.

A siliconized palm is a solution. Siliconized palms are made with tiny lines or dots of silicone that add grip and dexterity to the glove. The glove’s rest must be waterproof to withstand water.

Cut-Resistant Gloves

Ice fishing gloves are often advertised as being cut-proof or resistant.

It’s not really necessary for ice fishing and it doesn’t make any sense. Cut-resistant gloves are often not waterproof enough to ice fish because of their design.

These gloves should be saved for filleting only. They are a good idea to protect anyone who uses them.

Neoprene Gloves

The diving suit and wet suits made of Neoprene are well-known. This material does a remarkable job of trapping warm water close to the skin and protecting against the cold.

Other gloves trap warm air near the skin while neoprene glove assumes you will get wet. The neoprene gloves trap and keep that warm water close to your skin. This way you can keep warm even when it’s cold.

It is the antithesis of waterproof or waterproof-breathable materials.

How to manage leather ice fishing gloves

Leather gloves are great for their durability and long-lasting use. They are highly recommended, and I can’t say enough good things about them.

Leather is a natural material that is easily soaked. It was once skin. It’s not!

We can use leather treatment products to stop it from absorbing water and wearing too fast. These products are available in a variety of sizes. I usually recommend two.

Neatsfoot Oil is a great way to keep your gloves’ leather soft and free from cracks. Sno Seal can be used to repel water absorption.

Our Choices: Glacier Glove Pro Angler for Ice Shelter Use and Neo Sport Neoprene Gloves for Open Ice Use

You need to be prepared to go out and pull one of those slow little fish from the ice. The time of the year and the way you hit the ice will determine how much you need to bundle.

Although any of these gloves can keep your hands warm in winter, our top picks are the best for warmth and versatility.

Glacier Glove’s Pro Angler gloves are flexible and feature slit fingers and seamless palms. They are made of 2mm fleece-lined Neoprene for warmth and are our top choice for ice shanty usage.

Neo Sport’s Neoprene Wetsuit Gloves will be a great choice for fishing on open ice. They are available in two thicknesses, -3mm or 5mm. These gloves are ideal if you plan on staying outside in cold conditions and getting wet.

Before you make your purchase, be sure to check out our buyer’s guide section. It provides a comprehensive overview of glove technology. Knowing your options will help you make an informed purchase that you can be proud of, season after season.

Lewis Mark is a vastly experienced fly fisher. His encyclopedic knowledge of fly tying has led to start blog on fishing. He also review Fishing equipment based on his knowledge and experience.