Best Saltwater Fishing Rods 2021
Best Saltwater Fishing Rods 2021

Best Jig Rods

Best Jig Rods – Buyers Guide

Best Jig Rods – You can use jigs for swimming, casting, flipping, and even swimming! They are a popular choice for largemouth bass, especially during high summer, when the vegetation is thick.

You can use jigs with weedless versions and they can be used to fish in areas that other lures can’t.

But to make the most of this fantastic option, you need a specialized rod with just the right mix of strength and sensitivity.

We’d love to help you find a dedicated jigging rig. You’ll find below a brief explanation of the characteristics of a good jiggingrod, as well as some more in-depth considerations and reviews of some of our favorite jigging rods.

If you want to jig fish for bass, the most important decision is to choose the right jigging rig. The wrong rod can not only impact your casting but also result in missed fish. Bass jigs have to overcome obstacles that most lures do not, and without the right rod it’s hard to get a jig to perform correctly and efficiently.

The first thing to consider is where you intend to cast a jig. Because they have weedguard, jigs can get into tight places and thick covers without getting hung up.

It can be hard to get a bass out of those areas if it bites. This is why a strong rod with lots of pulling power and backbone is important.

The stiff weedguard can be a huge advantage on a Jig because it keeps you from getting caught up in cover. However, it can also hinder your chances of hooking up with fish. In jig fishing, a solid hookset is essential. If your rod is too soft, it will not be able pass the weedguard and get in the fish’s jaw. Particularly the heavy hooks that jigs come with.

The Best bass rods For jigs will be rated Heavy power With Fast action Tips. You can use jigs with a longer rod, so a casting rod of at least seven feet is advisable. Jig fishing is all about raising and lower the rod tip. The longer the rod, the more line you will pick up.

These are the specifications that you need to have on a rod for jig-fishing:

    • Casting rod
    • 7′-0’’ or more
    • Heavy Power
    • Rapid Action

You shouldn’t skimp on a jigging rod. A poorly made rod will not have the same sensitivity as a well-made one. You don’t have to spend a lot, but it doesn’t mean that you should.

Jig fishing is about detecting bites. Without a sensitive rod, you will miss many of them. Unfortunately, it is the big bass that tend to bite jigs lightly.

Best Jigging Rod Reviews

Doomsday Tackle “The 47”

Specifications

Pros

Cons

Length7’3″Power/ActionHeavy/Fast
MaterialCarbon Fiber
Handle:Split cork/casting
Guides9 + tip/Fuji Tangle FreeK guides with Alconite inserts
Size of the lure:3/8 to 1 1/2 ounces
Line weight:12-30 lb
Pieces1
  • Amazing blank
  • Excellent guides
  • Excellent handle
  • Extremely sensitive
  • Expensiv

Summary

Doomsday Tackle’s 47 may look like the rod your grandfather or father fished when you were a kid. Its creme-red styling is definitely a nod to that. It’s high-tech, but not a joke!

The 47 is 7’3″, made of carbon fiber. It is both light and strong. The tip is supply-sensitive, which allows you to get maximum performance from your jig, before stiffening into a strong, bass-dragging backbone. This blank is almost guaranteed hookset and control, and I would say that it’s the best rod we reviewed in this sense.

Protect your line with 10 Fuji guides with Alconite inserts.

Premium grade cork is used to make the handle. It has a comfortable split design that allows for easy casting and fighting.

The 47 is rated to handle really heavy jigs or line. This is testament to its blank strength as well as guide quality.

It would be difficult to find a better rod, especially at this price.

Daiwa Tatula TXT731MHFB

Specifications

Pros

Cons

Length7’3″
Power/ActionMedium-heavy/Fast
MaterialGraphite
Handle:Cork/casting
Guides9/Fuji aluminum oxide
Size of the lure:1/4 – 1 ounce
Line weight:10-20 lb
Pieces1
  • Amazing, completely blank
  • Excellent guides
  • Excellent handle
  • Extremely sensitive
  • Use a variety lures and techniques to attract them.
  • The 47 is not as good for jigging, but it’s possible.

Summary

Fishing is a hobby, so you should know Daiwa’s name. Their Tatula series rods will add serious value to your fishing gear that won’t break the bank.

The 7’3″ medium-heavy Tatula with fast action is our favorite. This versatile rod, similar to the Dobyns 734 is versatile and can be used for more than just jigging. It also offers excellent performance in tough cover. It is extremely sensitive and will feel the bass’s touch when it takes your jig in its mouth. It doesn’t have the same backbone as the 47, but what does it? The blank is sufficient to handle large bass in the weeds.

As you would expect from Fuji components, the guide quality is excellent. We would like to see a few more guides, just as we did with the St. Croix. But that’s just a quibble.

This rod’s long, continuous cork handle is amazing. If you like Dobyns, then the Tatula is a good choice.

This rod is a great all-arounder and you should give it a shot if your budget is tight.

Denali Lithium L884WJ

Specifications

Pros

Cons

Length7’4″
Power/ActionHeavy/Fast
MaterialGraphite
Handle:Split EVA foam-cork/casting
Guides13 + tip/304 stainless Steel, Semi-micro Duraloc
Size of the lure:1/2 – 1 ounce
Line weight:15-25 lb
Pieces1
  • Excellent blank
  • Amazing guides
  • Excellent handle
  • Extremely sensitive
  • Expensive

Summary

Denali’s Lithium Series rods were designed for tournament anglers. You’ll love what they can bring to the table, whether you’re pitching jigs to win prize money or to have fun on the lake.

The 884 measures 7’4″ in length, which gives you plenty of space to cast and enough room for your blank to show off its talents. The tip is quick and sensitive and offers enough action to work a good jig. The blank is strong enough to provide a solid hookset that can handle even the most heavy bass.

The quality of guides is outstanding, and there are 14 to ensure that you have the best possible experience during any fight.

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The 884 has a mix handle that combines cork and EVA foam. It is split-design. It is functional and attractive, contoured to fit and works great all day.

This is not a finesse rig, with lure sizes of 1/2 to 12 ounces and heavy line weights (especially if you’re using braid), this is not. The Denali 884 is an excellent choice if you want to hunt the tough stuff for real brutes.

Dobyns Rods 734C FH Champion Series

Specifications

Pros

Cons

Length7’3″
Power/ActionHeavy/Fast
MaterialGraphite
Handle:Cork/casting
Guides10 + tip/Zero Tangle Knit with SiC Inserts
Size of the lure:1/4 – 1 ounce
Line weight:10-20 lb
Pieces1
  • Amazing, just-in-all blank
  • Excellent guides
  • Excellent handle
  • Extremely sensitive
  • Use a variety lures and techniques to attract them.
  • The 47 is not as good for jigging, but it’s possible.

Summary

Dobyns rods are a well-known brand to bass anglers. They have proven their reliability season after season, tournament after tournament. The 734 from Dobyns is a remarkable addition to our reviews.

The 734 is 7’3″ in length and has a graphite blank that provides both strength and sensitivity. This rod is powerful enough to cast jigs and crankbaits as well as jerkbaits and worms. This is the best all-rounder rod I have ever seen. If you only have one rod, it would be a great choice.

You will have your line dry and free from fraying with 11 Kigan guides that are fitted with silicone carbide inserts.

The Dobyns 734’s cork handle is one of my favorites. A continuous handle is what I prefer on my rods. If you have one, this is a great choice.

This jig is rated for heavy line and jigs, but it can still throw 1/4-ounce jigs.

Did I mention it’s an all-rounder?

St. Croix Mojo

Specifications

Pros

Cons

Length7’4″
Power/ActionHeavy/Fast
MaterialGraphite
Handle:Split cork/casting
Guides8 + tip/Kigan master Hand 3D guides with aluminium oxide inserts
Size of the lure:3/8 to 1 1/2 ounces
Line weight:14-25 lb
Pieces1
  • Excellent blank
  • Excellent guides
  • Good handling
  • Extremely sensitive
  • You could use a guide to help you get started
  • Handle may be a little short

Summary

St. Croix is fast on the way to becoming a legend in the fishing industry. They’ve quickly established a reputation for making some of the best rods available. The Mojo will not disappoint, especially considering its price.

We recommend the Mojo 7’4″, which has heavy power and fast action. As with many St. Croix rods the blank is stiff. We find this heavy to be consistent with that trend. The Mojo, when combined with the fast, sensitive tip, will allow you to detect light strikes and work your jig well while still having the muscle you need for controlling a monster.

The Mojo’s guide quality is excellent. However, it could use an extra guide to keep up with its competitors.

Split cork handles are both attractive and comfortable. Although I would prefer a little more length, that is largely personal preference.

This rod, like the Denali 884 is rated for heavy line and big jigs, makes it an excellent choice for a dedicated rod for jig fishing.

Our Pick – Doomsday Tackle’s “The 47”!

The 47 is a great choice if you are looking for a dedicated rod for jigging.

It’s made with a carbon fibre blank that has excellent sensitivity and great power. This is the perfect jig for all levels of jigging. It’s easy to feel light strikes and work your jig like an expert. And when it comes time for the fight, you will be in for a rude surprise from the bass.

It has excellent guides, its handle is spacious and comfortable, and it is rated for extremely heavy tackle.

This is what I love about it.

Perhaps the best thing about it is its price.

If you don’t have the budget for a rod that is just for jigging you might consider the Daiwa Tatula or Dobyns 734. They offer serious jigging performance and can be used with all kinds of worms, crankbaits included.

We promise that you will be amazed by this selection of rods, no matter what you choose!

We’d love to hear your thoughts as always. Did we forget one of your favorite jigging sticks? Are you a fisherman?

Leave a comment below

Jigging for Bass: Basics of Rod Selection

Fishing a finesse Jig in spring is a great way to catch bass as they move from winter holding areas to shallows to spawn. You need plenty of action, flexibility at the tip, as well as as as much sensitivity from your rod as possible. You can use a medium to light rod for drop shotting and spinning tackle when you have lines that weigh as little as six pounds.

We’ve discussed and reviewed some of our favorite drop shot rods before, and if you’re looking for a finesse rod for jigging, any of those would be excellent choices.

A specialized jig set is beautiful in the summer when you have to pitch a jig through impossible cover. A drop shot rod won’t work here, so you will need a full-on rod for jigging. This means you need a powerful, fast-acting rod that can cast a smooth casting reel with strong line.

You’ll have access to the most vile cover Mother Nature has to give, but you will need a sturdy rod with a solid backbone to pull big bass out of stumps, lily pads and grass.

Hooksets can be problematic if you use a weedless Jig. The weed guard will soften the set. A jigging rod should be at least seven feet in length. A slightly longer rod will increase hookset and allow you to use the blank’s strength to your advantage when you have to muscle a brute out of cover.

A broomstick is not a great jigging tool. You need to have control in a fight, but also sensitivity.

Large bass will take a jig that has a light strike. Sometimes it’s more like a swallow than a hit. Greg Hackney, a dedicated professional jigging pro, explained that bass rarely slams a jig. Sometimes it’s just a pressure bite where there is a slight weight on the line, but nothing convincing. Sometimes it may be a slight tick.

Your jigging rod must be capable of transferring that subtle motion to your hands. We recommend that you use a fast, or even extra fast, action in combination with that much power.

In other words, you need a sensitive tip for a powerful rod.

How to choose the best action rod for jig fishing?

Choosing best action rod for jig fishing – We all know the old saying, “You get what you pay” but there are many products that are too expensive for what you actually get. Like any commodity, fishing tackle can be a bargain. There are bargains that don’t make it worth the effort to get them to your car. And there are also products that should make fish leap into your boat. Fishing tackle’s most expensive component, rods and reels, are the most important purchases. A good rod can be difficult to choose for those who want the best value for their money. We often ask ourselves questions such as “Why is this rod so expensive?” Is the $300 rod as good as the $150 rod? There are so many great rods out there that serious anglers can choose from. You could also end up with something you don’t need and spend a lot of money on something you won’t use. The rod that you don’t use is probably the most expensive. It was probably a waste of money, even if it was inexpensive. If it sits in a corner, it is a waste. You might also consider a rod that was expensive but you still use it often and love it.

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Casting rods are the most popular choice for bass anglers. Spinning rods are reserved for more specialized techniques and lighter lures. You can learn a lot about different techniques by reading our articles, including dropshotting, cranking and flipping/pitching. This will give you a good idea of which rod and action is best for each technique. Our selection of 7′ medium and 7′ heavy casting rods is a great choice for beginners. These rods can be used for all types of lures and techniques. As you become a bass angler, you will find that they will continue to be helpful. The decision is often about how much money you want to spend on your rod.

You will get a different return on the money that you spend on your rods depending on how often you fish, what you do, how serious you are about fishing, and if you participate in tournaments. The more expensive your rod is, the more sensitive it will become and the better accuracy you’ll be able achieve. Gary Loomis, who is the creator of some of the most popular rods in the world, said that he could build a rod that you couldn’t break but that you wouldn’t like to fish with it. While there are rods that claim to be indestructible, you won’t find any rods on the docks of serious bass anglers, or in the hands tour pros. They demand rods that can be light, sensitive, powerful, and durable. These rods are more expensive, but they’re well worth the extra money.

While a good rod won’t make you a better angler, it will make your fishing experience more enjoyable. A rod is a tool. A skilled craftsman will work better with a well-made tool. You will be able to sense more about what is happening with your lure if you have a good rod. You’ll be able, for example, to see if your jig is being pulled through sand, rocks, sticks, etc. and, more importantly, when it gets bit. This can sometimes be difficult to spot.

A good angler requires the ability to place your lure precisely where you want it. This is a key part of being a good angler. A rod with better graphite response and engineered actions will improve your casting abilities. Rod building skills and the ability use only the finest materials are required to create specific actions. This adds significantly to the cost. A good rod will improve your fishing skills, while a bad rod will make it worse.

Certain terms are used to describe the materials and the flexing characteristics of rods when you shop for them. These terms are used in various ways by different people, but we will attempt to explain a few of them in this article.

Parts and Terms for Fishing Rods

Take Action

This is how much the rod bends when you press down on the tip. Fast action rods will bend in the upper third of the blank. Medium or moderate actions will bend in the top third. Slow action will bend the rod starting in the lower third. Slow action rods can sometimes be called “parabolic”, meaning that the bend of the rod remains the same throughout its length. This description depends on the rod being described. A fast action fly rod, steelhead rod, or offshore rod will bend lower and more easily.

Bass rod actions tend to be fast or very fast. This is because they provide better sensitivity and more power for hooksetting. The rod shuts off faster or the bend ends faster on the blank. This means that you don’t need to move the rod as far to reach the stiffer portion of the blank. For most applications that require a short or long casting distance, fast action rods work well. Single hooks are best for jig and worm fishing.

The medium and fast rods provide more casting distance, but still have sufficient hooksetting power. These rods are used for applications that use treble hooks like crankbaits and topwater baits or other reactionbaits such as spinnerbaits. A treble hook’s bite is less than a single worm hook, and is therefore easier to remove from a fish. The slower action also means that the lure will not be pulled out of the fish’s mouth until it has fully swallowed it. The action of your rod will depend on the type of lure that you use.

Taper

Taper is often used interchangeably with “action”. It refers to the thickness of a rod as well as the thickness of its blank. Also, it describes where less material has been used which allows for more bend. Taper is synonymous with action.

Power

This is the strength or lifting power of the rod. If someone describes a rod as having a lot backbone, it means that it has a lot power. The power ratings are often described as heavy, heavy, medium, or medium. The line strength is directly related to power. Power rods with heavier line weights can handle heavier lines, while lighter power rods can handle light lines. You should keep your line test within the limit printed on the rod. A heavy rod can snap thin lines too quickly, while a lighter rod can snap heavy lines. The power ratings of different rods will vary. A heavy offshore rod and a bass rod won’t feel the same. One rod might be rated for 25lb and the other for 40lb lines.

You should choose the right rod for the water you are fishing. A strong rod is required to remove thick, heavy cover before the fish can tie you up. Clear water requires thin lines that are difficult to see to catch fish. A lighter rod is needed.

Responsiveness

Modulus is a term that refers to the rod’s ability to bend under load and to release stored energy. A finished rod can be made up of many layers of different materials, each contributing to its responsiveness. The rod will respond more if it is lighter, especially its tip. Gary Loomis says that weight is the biggest deterrent to performance. The modulus is the efficiency of the energy storage and release. This allows you to cast a precise cast on a lower trajectory.

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Graphite

This material is used to build bass rods and was introduced by Fenwick in the 70’s. Graphite is now produced at extremely high temperatures using a two-part process. One for tensile strength, the other for stiffness. Sometimes temperatures can exceed 3000°F! The furnaces are generally hotter than the fibers. This means that you will need less material to make a rod. Also, rods can be lighter and more sensitive.

High tensile strength can also be called high strain. The stiffness of a rod is known as tensile module or simply modulus. A rod made with high modulus but low tensile strength will be brittle. This is how high-modulus graphite rods can be advertised by brands at a low price. Not all steps of the graphite manufacturing process have been completed. You will get a lower quality rod.

Extreme temperatures are expensive and it costs a lot to get the best graphite. After heating, the parallel graphite fibres are incorporated into sheets of resin. Although you can reduce material costs by using less graphite and more resin, this will result in a softened rod. For a stiffer rod, you will need to add more material. This results in a heavier and less sensitive rod.

A second layer of fibers is added to the sheets of graphite fibres. This resin is perpendicularly placed on top of the graphite fibrils. The scrim is almost always made of fiberglass. G. Loomis GLX graphite and St. Croix SC4 graphite are exceptions to this rule. These materials contain carbon or graphite and create a rare and expensive material.

You can get the best rods by using different materials and layers of graphite or fiberglass. It is not difficult to make a graphite-rod. Many rods are being made in large plants in China. A material can be called graphite, but it may not have the same weight, sensitivity, or toughness as the best rods available today.

Fiberglass

Since the 1950’s, this material has been used in rod production. It is used to make some amazing rods. Glass is known for its soft actions and toughness. Glass rods are preferred by anglers who use them for crankbait throwing or any other application that requires a slow to medium action. Rod designers can create some amazing actions by using a mixture of graphite, glass, and other materials.

IM6, IM7, etc.

These are trade names used for specific graphite manufactured by Hexcel Corporation. These numbers do not represent industry standards, nor an indicator of quality. This is especially true since other companies may use these designations to refer graphite that is not made by Hexcel. They allow you to compare different materials used to make rods from the same manufacturer. If both rods are manufactured by the same manufacturer, you can be sure that the IM7 rod will use more graphite than IM6. Because rods could be made from different materials, it is more difficult to make the same statement about rods made by different companies.

Modulus

Modulus, as stated above, refers to the stiffness or density of graphite. It does not include the amount of material or the number graphite fibers in the sheets. It is wrong to base your decision on the modulus rating alone. Other factors should also be taken into consideration. You don’t want the most stiff rod for cranking or light line techniques. To ensure maximum performance and durability, the graphite must also be considered. A quality rod may also have other components that can increase its cost.

Guides

The majority of guides that you’ll find on bass rods today have a metal frame with a ceramic ring to allow the line to glide on. The price of this ring can vary widely. A single guide for a spinning rod could cost more than $30, or even a few dollars. SiC, also known as silicon carbide, is the most popular material. It has a super smooth surface that reduces friction during casting and retrieval. It allows for longer castings and lower heat. Heat kills fishing lines.

Alconite, another smooth material, is less expensive than SiC. Other ceramic materials that can be used in rods are aluminum oxide, Hardloy and Hialoy. They are also very affordable. The newest guides are made of Titanium wire. Even if the guides are bent flat, they will still spring back to their original positions. The standard stainless steel guide will break rather than bend, requiring expensive and tedious repairs. Some guides are made from a ring of stainless-steel instead of ceramic. Although these rings aren’t as smooth as ceramic inserts, they are extremely lightweight and reduce the overall rod weight.

A rod with more guides will cast better and be more expensive than one with less guides. A rod with more guides will bend more uniformly throughout its length. This allows it to use all of its power to cast longer and fight fish. This is demonstrated best by the Fuji Concept Guide System.

Cork

Cork is a great choice for a lightweight, comfortable handle that can be easily gripped even when wet. Cork is beautiful! The quality of cork depends on the price. The rod manufacturer will base the cork quality on how much the rod cost. You’ll get the highest quality cork with the most expensive rods.

Reel Seats

The reel seat holds your reel on the rod. Reel seats are very similar. Most anglers prefer graphite seat with a cutout that allows them to feel the blank. Reel seats with no plastic cushion in the metal hoods where the feet of the reel fit will be the cheapest. These seats can rust and stain your reel. These seats can also bind up making it more difficult to take out your reel. The cardboard spacers that are placed between the reel blank and the reel seat, especially if they’re made overseas, will dampen vibrations and cause the rod to spin.

It’s clear why rods that are the best value for money cost so much when you consider all of these factors. Modern bass rods are no exception. Anglers expect fast, crisp actions and light weight. They also need the ability to withstand a beating in the rod locker or on your pickup’s deck.

You should ensure that you are getting the correct rod for your technique by reading the section on the Tackle Warehouse website. Next, review the descriptions of the rods on the site and then purchase the best rod that you can afford. Tackle Warehouse only features the top rods in each price range. You won’t find a bad rod. Call our toll-free number to speak to one of our staff members for more information about the rod that interests you. We are competitive fishers and have been bass fishing for many years so we are familiar with the products we sell.

Lewis Mark is a vastly experienced fly fisher. His encyclopedic knowledge of fly tying has led to start blog on fishing. He also review Fishing equipment based on his knowledge and experience.